Conservation assets

You generally can’t deduct your expenses for depreciable conservation assets. However, you can deduct certain amounts you pay or incur for an assessment for depreciable property that a soil and water conservation or drainage district levies against your farm.

**You must capitalize expenses to buy, build, install, or improve depreciable structures or facilities. These expenses include those for materials, tile (including drainage tile), pipe, pumps (and other equipment), supplies, wages, fuel, hauling, and moving dirt when making or installing structures such as tanks, reservoirs, culverts, canals, dams, drainage systems, waste management systems or wells composed of masonry, concrete, tile (including drainage tile), metal, or wood. You recover your capital investment through annual allowances for depreciation. You can deduct soil and water conservation expenses for nondepreciable earthen items. Nondepreciable earthen items include certain dams, ponds, and terraces.

Water well. You can’t deduct the cost of drilling a water well for irrigation and other agricultural purposes as a soil and water conservation expense. It is a capital expense. You recover your cost through depreciation. You must also capitalize your cost for drilling a test hole. If the test hole produces no water and you continue drilling, the cost of the test hole is added to the cost of the producing well. You can recover the total cost through depreciation deductions.

If a test hole, dry hole, or dried-up well (resulting from prolonged lack of rain, for instance) is abandoned, you can deduct your unrecovered cost in the year of abandonment. Abandonment means that all economic benefits from the well are terminated. For example, filling or sealing a well excavation or casing so that all economic benefits from the well are terminated constitutes an abandonment.

Endangered species recovery expenses. If you are in the business of farming and meet other specific requirements, you can choose to deduct the conservation expenses discussed earlier as endangered species recovery expenses. Otherwise, these are capital expenses that must be added to the basis of the land. The expenses must be paid or incurred for the purpose of achieving site-specific management actions recommended in a recovery plan approved under section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973.

 

Plants producing the
following crops or yields have a nationwide weighted average preproductive
period of more than 2 years
.
Almonds
Apples
Apricots
Avocados
Blueberries
Cherries
Chestnuts
Coffee beans
Currants
Dates
• Figs
Grapefruit
Grapes
Guavas
Kiwifruit
Kumquat s
• Lemons
Limes
Macadamia nuts
Mangoes
Nectarines
Olives
Oranges
Peaches
Pears
Pecans
Persimmons
• Pistachio nuts
Plums
• Pomegranates
• Prunes
Tangelos
Tangerines
Tangors
Walnuts